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Heme, a Poisonous Nutrient, Tracked by ‘Green Lantern’ Sensor

Reddi lab features in Research Horizons for recent PNAS paper

Meet Casey Bethel, Georgia's 2017 Teacher of the Year

College of Sciences basks in the reflected glow of a GIFTed science teacher

New award recognizes Wendy Kelly, Joseph Sadghi, and William Baron

Congratulations to Professors Wendy Kelly, Joseph Sadighi and William Baron as the inaugural recipients of the Vasser Woolley Award for Excellence in Instruction in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

Kristy S. Syhapanha Puts a Foot in the Door of Her Dream Career

Kristy Southysa Syhapanha never thought of studying at Georgia Tech. She didn’t think she would qualify, so she didn’t bother – at first.

Missing Links Brewed in Primordial Puddles?

Researchers have achieved a significant advancement toward unlocking a longstanding evolutionary mystery -- how components of RNA and DNA formed from chemicals present on early Earth before life existed.

Welcome to Dr. Gutekunst

The School of Chemistry and Biochemistry is pleased to welcome Dr. Will R. Gutekunst, who will join the faculty on July 1, 2016 as an Assistant Professor.

Welcome to Dr. La Pierre

The School of Chemistry and Biochemistry is pleased to welcome Dr. Henry S. La Pierre, who will join the faculty on July 1, 2016 as an Assistant Professor with a courtesy appointment in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering and the Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Program.

Seminars & Events

Meeting - Tuesday, August 16, 2016 - 11:00am - MoSE 3201A
Prof. Kenneth Brown - Georgia Institute of Technology
Colloquium - Thursday, September 1, 2016 - 4:00pm - MoSE G011
Prof. Christine Payne - Georgia Institute of Technology
Colloquium - Thursday, September 8, 2016 - 4:00pm - MoSE G011
Prof. Jennifer DuBois - Montana State University
Biochemistry Division Seminar - Tuesday, September 13, 2016 - 4:00pm - MoSE 3201A

Featured Research

Article Title
Research Authors
Ruditskiy, Aleksey; Xia, Younan.
Citation
Journal of the American Chemical Society (2016), Vol. 138(9), 3161–3167
Miscellaneous Details
This work was supported in part by research grants from the NSF (DMR 1506018) and the NIH (R01 CA 138527). A.R. was supported by a Graduate Research Fellowship from the NSF.

We report a polyol method for the facile synthesis of Ag nanocubes having sharp corners and edges, together with edge lengths below 15 nm. The rapid nucleation of Ag atoms was facilitated through the addition of a trace amount of SH- to generate Ag2S clusters while the corners and edges of the nanocubes were sharpened through the introduction of Br- as a regulator of the growth kinetics and a capping agent for the Ag(100) surface. Because of their much smaller size relative to the more commonly used capping agent based on poly(vinylpyrrolidone), Br- ions are more effective in passivating the {100} facets on very small Ag nanocubes. The mechanistic roles of these additives, along with the effects of their interactions with other species present in the reaction solution, were all systematically investigated. The concentration of SH- was found to be a particularly effective parameter for tuning the edge length of the nanocubes. As a result of the understanding gained during the course of this study, Ag nanocubes with uniform edge lengths controllable in the range of 13-23 nm could be reliably produced. The nanocubes of 13.4 +/- 0.4 nm in edge length constitute the smallest nanocrystals of this kind reported to date; they also possess sharper corners and edges relative to the limited examples of sub-20 nm Ag nanocubes reported in the literature. The availability of such small and sharp Ag nanocubes will open the door to an array of applications in plasmonics, catalysis, and biomedicine.

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